Cervical cancer: the cancer of inequalities

Cervical cancer is an unfortunate indicator of global health inequities. Worldwide, cervical cancer is the 4th most common cancer in women, with an estimated 604,000 new cases appearing in 2020. According to the WHO, of the 342,000 global deaths in 2020, about 90% occur in Low and Middle Income countries (LMIC). 

The tragic aspect of cervical cancer is that it is largely preventable. We estimate that more than 95% of cervical cancer cases are a result of a Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection, which is typically transmitted through sex. HPV is a group of more than 150 related viruses, although HPV 16 and HPV-18 are largely associated with increased risk of cervical cancer.  A HPV vaccine exists to protect against most types of HPV that are linked with cancer. However, the vaccine should be administered at a young age (between 9 to 12 years old)and up to 26 years old at the latest. 

Unfortunately, less than 30% of LMIC have introduced HPV vaccination and less than 3% of adolescents are vaccinated against HPV. The combination with low cervical cancer screenings means that many women do not find out about their HPV-related cervical cancer until it is too late, leading to hundreds of thousands of preventable deaths. According to the WHO, by 2030 it will kill more than 443,000 women per year in the world if no concrete action is taken urgently. 98% of these deaths will occur in developing countries, with 90% of them in sub-Saharan Africa.

Cervical cancer is indicative of health inequalities and gender inequalities. Its burden rests solely on women and girls. Globally it is the 4th most common cancer in women, despite being largely preventable in the first place. With vaccinations and screenings, more than 340,000 deaths could be prevented every year. 

The post Cervical cancer: the cancer of inequalities appeared first on Doctors of the World.

The post Cervical cancer: the cancer of inequalities appeared first on Doctors of the World.

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Alexandra Nizet | Refugee Watch (2023-01-31T11:16:32+00:00) » Cervical cancer: the cancer of inequalities. Retrieved from https://www.refugee.watch/2022/11/01/cervical-cancer-the-cancer-of-inequalities/.
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" » Cervical cancer: the cancer of inequalities." Alexandra Nizet | Refugee Watch - Accessed 2023-01-31T11:16:32+00:00. https://www.refugee.watch/2022/11/01/cervical-cancer-the-cancer-of-inequalities/
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" » Cervical cancer: the cancer of inequalities." Alexandra Nizet | Refugee Watch [Online]. Available: https://www.refugee.watch/2022/11/01/cervical-cancer-the-cancer-of-inequalities/. [Accessed: 2023-01-31T11:16:32+00:00]
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» Cervical cancer: the cancer of inequalities | Alexandra Nizet | Refugee Watch | https://www.refugee.watch/2022/11/01/cervical-cancer-the-cancer-of-inequalities/ | 2023-01-31T11:16:32+00:00
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